Penn Relays Live Blog: Day 3

It's Saturday, the final day of the Penn Relays, and we have USA vs. the World, the College Men's 4xMile and much more! Follow along as our writers liveblog all the action.

 

Game 31: Princeton – The Good, the Bad & the Ugly (M. Hoops)

Good Bad & Ugly

 

 

 

 

 

Penn (9-22, 6-8 Ivy) closed out its season tonight with a loss to arch-rival Princeton (17-11, 10-4), 71-58, in a game that mattered little in the standings but plenty to the young men on the floor. In a performance evocative of its entire season, the Quakers hung around at first, before inconsistency took its toll and led to yet another disappointing defeat.

The Good: Tony Hicks (1st Half Edition)

In his final game of the season, the freshman came out like gangbusters, draining shots from all over the floor. Whether it was cutting and spinning to get to the basket, or pump-faking and firing away from the elbow, Hicks simply couldn't miss, dropping in 17 points on 7-9 shooting to energize the Palestra and carry the Quakers to a halftime tie while his struggling teammates combined to shoot 5-15. Even better, Hicks managed to take care of the ball as well, turning the ball over only once in the first period. If Hicks can turn in performances like that on a nightly basis next season, Penn will boast a backcourt that can potentially stand up to even mighty Harvard.

The Bad: Tony Hicks (2nd Half Edition)

But in the 2nd half, the wheels came off. The Tigers' guards tightened up on Hicks the rest of the way, limiting him to only 5 points on an unsightly 2-10 shooting performance. In the blink of a eye, Hicks reminded us all of the inconsistency that plagued this year's Quakers squad during Ivy play: flashes of brilliance at times (a stunning upset over Harvard) cancelled out by moments of sheer futility (losing to Dartmouth at home). Like the rest of his class, Hicks still has a lot to learn.

The Ugly: Penn's Mental Effort in the final 5 minutes

Though there was technically nothing to play for in tonight's game, the reality is that a huge amount of pride is riding on every Penn-Princeton matchup. And in this, the 228th meeting between the two historic rivals, the Quakers showed none of that pride when the chips were down. Down by 2 with just over 5 minutes to play, the early fight that the Red and Blue showed simply disappeared when T.J. Bray hit a 3 from the right elbow to give Princeton a 56-51 lead. As a result, what could have been a nail-biting finish and another classic duel turned decidedly anticlimactic, as the Tigers rolled the rest of the way. If the Quakers want to contend in the Ivy League next year, they simply have to avoid fading after the opposition hits clutch shots.

Three Up, Three Down: Cornell Edition

Three Up Three DownWith the Quakers coming off an upset win over Columbia to open their first Ivy weekend of the season, we take a look at who's hot–and who's not–as the Big Red come to town.

Three Up-

Miles Cartwright- The junior captain stepped up as a leader when the Red and Blue needed him the most Friday, pouring in eight points in the game's final two minutes to ensure that a nine-point second half lead wouldn't go to waste. Additionally, Cartwright was able to minimize his turnovers, a positive trend that he'll need to keep up against a Cornell team that averages seven steals a game.

Steve Rennard- After seemingly being left for dead, the junior was able to revitalize his season against Columbia. In 29 minutes of action, Rennard was able to score seven points on 2-4 shooting, including his first made three-pointer since a win over NJIT on Jan. 17th. If Rennard can maybe, just maybe, recapture his shooting touch from last year, the Quakers will only benefit from having yet another outside scoring threat.

Henry Brooks- Much like Rennard, Brooks was able to reverse an early-season bad habit on Friday night. In 28 minutes of action, the sophomore forward managed to keep himself out of foul trouble against Columbia's rangy big men, hearing only two calls against him on the night. Additionally, he showed some nice range in going 2-for-4 from the field, including one shot that was just inside the three-point line.

Three Down-

Patrick Lucas Perry's minutes, again- Where was he? If people thought that PLP had turned the corner after his sterling performance against Temple, they were wrong. Lucas-Perry received 15 minutes of playing time, but it seemed like far less, as he never seemed to establish much of a presence for himself on the court. The sophomore wound up going 0-for-2 from the field, and only managed to pick up a single rebound.

Every freshman not named Darien Nelson-Henry- It was a rough night for most of the Quakers' youngsters. Jamal Lewis tallied one assist, two turnovers, and a whopping three fouls in only seven minutes of action, earning him a comfortable spot on the bench. Tony Hicks scored eight points, but went 1-for-5 from the field. And, in keeping with tradition, Julian Harrell never even had a chance to take his warm-ups off.

The rims in the Palestra whenever Fran Dougherty shoots- Playing for the first time in a month following a bout with mononucleosis, the dynamic junior wound up going 1-for-5 from the field in 18 minutes off the bench, but his stat sheet could have looked a lot better. Dougherty had shot after shot take the exact wrong bounce at the exact wrong time, spoiling some sharp inside post and isolation moves by the athletic forward.

Game 19: Columbia – The Good, The Bad & the Ugly

 

Good Bad & UglyTHE GOOD– Miles Cartwright's Late Poise

With everything on the line, the Quakers' captain stepped up when they needed him the most. After a Brian Barbour three tied the game and sucked the energy out of the Palestra, the junior coolly sank a jumper from the left elbow with 25.1 seconds left to give Penn a 58-56 lead that they wouldn't relinquish. In addition Cartwright went 4-for-4 from the line after the Lions attempted to turn the game into a foul-fest to eliminate any hope of a miraculous Columbia comeback. Cartwright went a perfect 10-for-10 from the line on the night, scoring a game high 21 points on 6-for-14 shooting.

THE BAD– Darien Nelson-Henry's interior defense

Though the stat sheet may show four blocks for DNH on the night, it doesn't even begin to tell the story of the freshman's night. Going against 6-foot-9 senior Mark Cisco, Nelson-Henry got consistently torched in the second half, surrendering 12 points to the Lion on 5-for-6 shooting. It seemed as if Nelson-Henry was never able to locate the Columbia leader in space, frequently leaving-him wide open for easy baseline jump shots. Cisco wound up being the game's most efficient scorer, helping the Lions claw their way back from a nine-point second half deficit in a game that the Quakers could have put to bed early.

THE UGLY– Columbia's three-point shooting

The Lions were dreadful from distance all night long, closing out the game with a woeful 3-for-17 performance. Though Brian Barbour was able to cause some late fireworks with his game-tying trey, it was the only long-distance shot that he was able to convert, as the senior finished 1-for-5 on the night, a huge step down from his typical standards. Barbour didn't receive much support from his teammates, as freshman Grant Mullins went 1-for-7, junior Alex Rosenberg went 1-for-3 and freshman Maodo Lo went 0-for-2. If Columbia had been able to get its outside scoring at all, perhaps they would have escaped from the Palestra with a win.

 

 

Game 11 Live Blog: M. Hoops V. Wagner

I'm here with senior basketball beat writer David Greenbaum at the Spiro Sports Center in Staten Island, N.Y., as the 2-8 Penn Quakers take on the 5-5 Wagner Seahawks. Join us as we take you through the action.

Quakers tap Tony Tenisci to helm women’s track

Friday morning, Track & Field and Cross Country Director Steve Dolan announced the promotion of assistant throwing coach Tony Tenisci to the position of Betty J. Costanza Head Coach of Women's Track & Field after 27 years on staff.

Tenisci, famous in track circles for developing the sport of women's hammer throw in America, has a long history with the program, coaching four individuals in six different events to seven Heptagonal championships during his tenure as assistant.

Tenisci is excited to take on the additional responsibilities associated with becoming head coach.

"I am honored to be in this position," Tenisci said in a statement. "It is named after Betty Costanza, with whom I worked for 16 years. She was an extraordinary woman and Hall of Fame coach, so for me to carry on her name and traditions is a great honor."

By accepting the position, Tenisci becomes only the 3rd head coach in the entire history of the women's track program, following in the footsteps of Costanza, who coached the team from its inception in 1976 until 2002, and Gwen Harris, who resigned at the conclusion of last season.

Penn Sports Plus: Judo Edition

We’re excited to bring to you Penn Sports Plus, a new Buzz feature that spotlights people in the Penn Sports scene who don’t usually get much attention.  No current Penn athletics players or coaches will be featured in Penn Sports Plus, so we’ll have plenty of space for the unsung athletes and athletic workers at Penn.

This week, we feature the Penn Judo Club, with sophomore president Harry Robinson taking us down to the mat.

How did you get the Judo Club back up and running on campus?

Robinson: Well, the first thing I did was hold elections, which was interesting because I was the only member of the club at the beginning of the year. So for a while I was the official President, Vice-President, Secretary, and Treasurer of the club, which was pretty interesting. The first thing I had to do was find someone who was actually willing to teach, I'm not skilled enough to actually instruct, so I talked to my Sensei from where I used to do Judo in Bryn Mawr, P.A., he got someone he knew who was teaching at Drexel Judo Club to come to Penn a couple of days a week to teach us... after that it was just a matter of finding people to show up.

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